Sipos Jnos

(6 találat)
# Cím Abstract Folyóirat Oldalszám
Bartk anatliai gyjtsnek egy siratja s annak zenei httere abs.
A Lament from Bartk’s Anatolian Collection and its Musical Background
Jnos Sipos

Bartk collected folk music in Turkey in 1936, and his Turkish collection was published in 1976 almost simultaneously in Hungary and America and in 1991 in Turkey.
How do Bartk’s conclusions stand the test in the light of an examination of larger Turkish material? I have investigated this question in four of my books, and detailed analysis points way beyond the scope of a single paper. This time I deal with a single melody, the lament No.51 of Bartk’s collection and with its larger Anatolian, Hungarian and other connections.
Can this melody be an important link between important Hungarian and Anatolian folk music layers? If so, why did Bartk not realize this? Does Bartk’s incredibly detailed method of transcription have any practical benefit in ethnomusicological research? Is the unique intonation of certain tones in the Anatolian and Hungarian lament accidental or is there a consistent system? Can we find the musical form represented by this Turkish lament in the folk music of other Turkic and non-Turkic people, if yes what kind of conclusion can be drawn?
To try to find an answer to some of these question I use the melodies and results of my Turkish, Azeri, Karachay-Balkar, Kazakh, Mongolian and Kyrgyz research of more then 7000 songs.
2007., 45. évf. 1. szám 79. - 91.o
Nhny kaukzusi np zenjrl abs.
Some Remarks about the Music of a Few Minorities Living in Azerbaijan
Jnos Sipos

The ethnomusicological research of Jnos Sipos has grown to include the comparative examination of the folk music of a vast area stretching from the Volga-Kama region to Anatolia and further east. One objective in this research was the exploration of the folk music in Azerbaijan.
In the valleys and on the hillsides divided by the enormous mountain range of the Caucasus, several ethnic groups live. In the north of Azerbaijan, one can meet, for example, Avars, Tsakhurs, Tats, Mountain Jews in villages on the southern slopes of the Caucasus, and inside the country there are Turks from Uzbekistan and Russians. In this paper you learn a few facts about these peoples and the tunes the author collected among them.
The present article is a chapter from his book “Azeri Folksongs-At the Fountain-Head of Music” (Budapest: Academian Publishing House, 2004). The Azeris living between the two major regions mentioned above are close language relatives of the Anatolian Turks, but the ethnogenesis of the two peoples developed differently. It is illuminating to study how Azeri folk music, and to discern more remote connections between Azeri musical layers and strata of other Turkic folk musics and the folk music of Hungarians.
The preface of the book is followed by a history of Azerbaijan, after which the collecting expedition is described illustrated with maps and photos. The highlight of the book is the comparative presentation of Azeri musical styles with an ample anthology of music examples. The song texts and their English and Hungarian translation may be useful for those interested in Azeri language and folk culture. The book ends with indices and notes, as well as an important supplement: a CD with the finest tunes of the collected stock.
2005., 43. évf. 2. szám 193. - 213.o
Npdalok a kazak sztyeppe kt vgrl. 1. rsz abs.
Kazakh Folksongs from the Two Edges of the Steppe
Jnos Sipos

What business does a Hungarian ethnomusicologist have in the Kazakh steppe?
Since the culture of the Hungarians settling in the Carpathian Basin displayed strong Turkic influences, it is quite justified to presume that Hungarian folk music also incorporated significant Turkic effects or layers. Let us remember a beautiful phrase by Bence Szabolcsi: The Hungarians are the outermost branch spreading from the age-old tree of the great Asian musical culture rooted in the souls of a variety of peoples living from China through Central Asia to the Black Sea… (Szabolcsi 1934). It is no wonder that researching the eastern elements in Hungarian folk music has a great tradition. At the very beginning of this process such great names can be encountered as those of Bla Bartk and Zoltn Kodly.
As is known, the Chuvash, Tatar, Bashkir, Kazakh, Turkmen, Azeri and Anatolian Turkish people (listing the great ethnic units from north to south) live in the western part of the immense Turkic language bloc. There have been Hungarian attempts to explore the music of the Turkic peoples living on this vast crescent. In the northern area Lszl Vikr collected a significant material of Chuvash, Tatar and Bashkir tunes. Down in the south, Bla Bartk’s collection in Turkey in 1936, aimed at the comparative exploration of Anatolian folk music, launched the work, joined in 1987-93 by my Anatolian collection.
The Kazakh expeditions were part of a this comprehensive project. I have succeeded in conducting several field researches among Kazakhs with support from the British Royal Academy’s Stein-Arnold Fund as well as the Soros Foundation. As a result, I have gained an insight into the music of Mongolian Kazakhs and other Kazakh people who moved to Turkmenistan and then moved back to southwest Kazakhstan in recent decades.
These four studies in the Magyar Zene are to afford a comprehensive glimpse of the folk music of these two Kazakh ethnic groups living some 3000 km apart. Besides presenting the material systematized and proportionately with the characteristics, I also try to give a comparison between the musics of the two groups. Whenever possible, analogies or contacts with the musical styles of other Turkic peoples living elsewhere and with the Hungarians are also pointed out. In the present study I give an account about the antecedents of the Kazakh expeditions, and I begin to make known the south-west Kazakh folk song types.
Finally I drow attention to the fact, that this material will be published in 2001 by the Academian Publishing House under the title: Jnos Sipos, Kazakh Folksongs from the Two End of the Steppe, with a CD-attachement
(http://www.akkrt.hu).
2001., 39. évf. 1. szám 27. - 56.o
Npdalok a kazak sztyeppe kt vgrl. 2. rsz : nyugat-kazak dallamtpusok abs.
Kazakh Folksongs from the Two Edges of the Steppe, 2
Jnos Sipos

These four articles are to serve as comprehensive study on the folk music of two Kazakh ethnic groups, one living on the eastern shore of the Caspian See and the other living some 3000 km apart to the East, in Bayan lgiz, West Mongolia.
In the first article I wrote about the antecedents of my expeditions, described the collecting trip to South-West Kazakhstan and began to characterize the Kazakh musical styles.
In the second article we continue to make acquaintances with the remaining south-western Kazakh folk music styles and types, and with their connections to the folk music of other Turkic peoples and the Hungarian.
It is worth mentioning that an English book based on these articles was published by the Academian Publishing House under the title Jnos Sipos, Kazakh Folksongs from the Two Edges of the Steppe with a CD supplement (www.akkrt.hu).
2001., 39. évf. 2. szám 183. - 200.o
Npdalok a kazak sztyeppe kt vgrl. 3. rsz : a mongliai kazakok dallamai abs.
Kazakh Folksongs from the Two Edges of the Steppe, 3
Jnos Sipos

These four articles are to serve as a comprehensive study on the folk music of two Kazakh ethnic groups, one living on the eastern shore of the Caspian See and the other living some 3000 km apart to the East, in Bayan lgiz, West Mongolia. In the first article I wrote about the antecedents of my expeditions, described the collecting trip to South-West Kazakhstan and began to characterize the Kazakh musical styles. In the second article we make acquaintances with the remaining south-western Kazakh folk music styles and types, and with their connections to the folk music of other Turkic peoples and the Hungarian.
In the present third article one can read about the folk music of the Kazakh minory living in Mongolia. It is worth mentioning that an English book based on these articles was published by the Academian Publishing House under the title Jnos Sipos, Kazakh Folksongs from the Two Edges of the Steppe with a CD supplement (www.akkrt.hu).
2001., 39. évf. 3. szám 301. - 320.o
Npdalok a kazak sztyeppe kt vgrl. 4. (befejez) rsz : a kt kazak terlet zenjnek sszehasonltsa abs.
Kazakh Folksongs from the Two Edges of the Steppe, 4
Jnos Sipos

These four articles are to serve as a comprehensive study on the folk music of two Kazakh ethnic groups, one living on the eastern shore of the Caspian See and the other living some 3000 km apart to the East, in Bayan lgiz, West Mongolia. In the first article I wrote about the antecedents of my expeditions, described the collecting trip to south-west Kazakhstan and began to characterize the Kazakh musical styles. In the second article we made acquaintances with the remaining south-western Kazakh folk music styles and types, and with their connections to the folk music of other Turkic peoples and the Hungarian. In the third article one can read about the folk music of the Kazakh minority living in Mongolia.
In the last article I try to give a comparison between the music of the two Kazakh groups mentioned above. Whenever possible, analogies or contacts with the musical styles of other Turkic peoples living elsewhere and with the Hungarians are also pointed out.
An English book based on these articles was published by the Academian Publishing House under the title Jnos Sipos, Kazakh Folksongs from the Two Edges of the Steppe with a CD supplement (www.akkrt.hu).
2001., 39. évf. 4. szám 425. - 440.o