Hovnszki Mria

(3 találat)
# Cím Abstract Folyóirat Oldalszám
»Csokonai-dallamok« s forrsaik (II.) abs.
“Melodies of Csokonai” and Their Sources
Mria Hovnszki

The essay tries to reveal and collect those “melodies of Csokonai” which have come down in contemporary manuscripts or printed papers, and served as a model for the poet’s verses modelled on pre-existing tunes. A large number of pieces of Csokonai’s work consist of songs that were written, continuing traditions of popular “college culture” or composed to follow the fashionable West-European Klavierlied. It is important to say that Csokonai always used different musical styles in accordance with their own places, and in his “musical theory” he wanted to serve the most modern and elite musical aesthwetics. (He often quoted J. J. Rousseau, Sulzer, Batteux.
His musical collection consists of three songs composed by J. Haydn, Mr. Stpa and J. Kossovits, and was published in 1803 in Vienna. He wanted to issue his Anacreon’s translations with tunes like Anacreon’s edition of Paris. He translated cantatas, canzonettas and duets by Metastasio and wrote pastorals. What is more, he was planning original operas (so-called “nekes jtkok” i. e. plays connected with singing), naturally he would have just written the libretto. As to their genres, contents and styles, these melodies and texts are very heterogeneous because Csokonai drew on the most different sources according to a given piece. Extraordinarily variable oral folk songs were used as well as artistic song by Haydn.
So this article consists partly of primitively written “melodiarium”, partly modern written manuscript collections with instrumental accompaniment (generally guitar or fortepiano), partly contemporary printed papers. Finally, certain songs by Csokonai were used to interpret recent “live” folk songs. By virtue of revealing and comparing tunes we can not only understand his creative method more deeply but we can get a better comprehension of the works’ effect on contemporary reception.
The critical edition of Csokonai has published a fraction of the tunes in the past years. Since it happened to have many phiological faults as well as inconsistencies, interpretation has always begun by pointing these out.
2006., 44. évf. 4. szám 439. - 479.o
»Csokonai-dallamok« s forrsaik [I. rsz] abs.
“Melodies of Csokonai” and Their Sources
Mria Hovnszki

The essay tries to reveal and collect those “melodies of Csokonai” which have come down in contemporary manuscripts or printed papers, and served as a model for the poet’s verses modelled on pre-existing tunes. A large number of pieces of Csokonai’s work consist of songs that were written, continuing traditions of popular “college culture” or composed to follow the fashionable West-European Klavierlied. It is important to say that Csokonai always used different musical styles in accordance with their own places, and in his “musical theory” he wanted to serve the most modern and elite musical aesthwetics. (He often quoted J. J. Rousseau, Sulzer, Batteux.
His musical collection consists of three songs composed by J. Haydn, Mr. Stpa and J. Kossovits, and was published in 1803 in Vienna. He wanted to issue his Anacreon’s translations with tunes like Anacreon’s edition of Paris. He translated cantatas, canzonettas and duets by Metastasio and wrote pastorals. What is more, he was planning original operas (so-called “nekes jtkok” i. e. plays connected with singing), naturally he would have just written the libretto. As to their genres, contents and styles, these melodies and texts are very heterogeneous because Csokonai drew on the most different sources according to a given piece. Extraordinarily variable oral folk songs were used as well as artistic song by Haydn.
So this article consists partly of primitively written “melodiarium”, partly modern written manuscript collections with instrumental accompaniment (generally guitar or fortepiano), partly contemporary printed papers. Finally, certain songs by Csokonai were used to interpret recent “live” folk songs. By virtue of revealing and comparing tunes we can not only understand his creative method more deeply but we can get a better comprehension of the works’ effect on contemporary reception.
The critical edition of Csokonai has published a fraction of the tunes in the past years. Since it happened to have many phiological faults as well as inconsistencies, interpretation has always begun by pointing these out.
2006., 44. évf. 3. szám 331. - 358.o
Magyar nyelv nekelt (dal-)kltszet a 18. szzadi Magyarorszgon abs.
Hungarian Lyric Poetry in the 18th Century in Hungary
Mria Hovnszki

This essay consisiting two chapters namely the gallant lyric poetry and the rococo song poetry examines the reformation of traditional Hungarian lyric generally written in accentual-syllabic scansion, i.e. its separation from the earlier forms, pioneered by the gallant-rococo poetry of Ferenc Faludi and Lszl Amade. The modernization of Hungarian lyrics means not only the renewal of the forms, but of the expressions as well, initialized by the new music of the 18th century Europe called gallant Empfindsamer songs (Lieder) and by the opera and lyrics literature of school dramas. Therefore this treatise is based upon the research of those lyric texts which melodies have been remained as well.
Since in fact no Hungarian composing existed till the end of the 18th century not only the genre of “art song” (Lied) but the cult of singing had to be created and popularized by poets e. g. Mikls Rvai, dm Horvth, Ferenc Verseghy and Mihly Csokonai. Through their oeuvre this essay discovers on the one part the connection of the foreign tunes and the “innovation of the metre”, and on the other hand the Hungarian Empfindsamer songs which became fashionable after the Hungarian translation of the German Musenalmanachs (1780-90) and culminated in the verbunkoche lyrics at the end of the 18th century.
2007., 45. évf. 3. szám 289. - 342.o

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